Vladimir Zharov


June 8, 2017

UAMS Researchers Kill Cancer Cells Using Nanobubble Spaser as the World’s Smallest Laser

Susan Van Dusen

LITTLE ROCK — A University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) research team led by Vladimir Zharov, Ph.D., D.Sc., has demonstrated the ability to kill single cancer cells using the world’s smallest laser. At 22 nanometers in diameter, the laser — known as a spaser — is capable of detecting and killing single cancer cells…


December 22, 2016

UAMS Reaches Milestones in 2016

Ben Boulden

Dec. 22, 2016 | In 2016, UAMS and its physicians and researchers achieved several firsts along with other milestones in patient care, education and research. From treating chronic pain and brain tumors to starting the first comprehensive research study of synthetic marijuana products and graduating the largest class in UAMS history, the university continued to…


March 16, 2016

UAMS Team First to Demonstrate Blood Flow Manipulation

Susan Van Dusen

Discovery Could Lead to Early Detection of Cancer and Other Diseases LITTLE ROCK — A University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) research team led by Vladimir Zharov, Ph.D., D.Sc., is the first to demonstrate noninvasive, remote manipulation of blood and lymph flow in the body. This discovery makes possible several advances, including blood transportation…


September 10, 2015

UAMS Scientist Awarded $1.7 Million Grant for Melanoma Research

Ben Boulden

Sept. 10, 2015 | University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) researcher Vladimir Zharov, Ph.D., D.Sc., was awarded a $1.7 million grant by the National Cancer Institute for clinical testing of a new technology called Theranostics, which is an integration of early diagnosis and treatment of melanoma.


August 3, 2015

UAMS Part of Arkansas Consortium Awarded $20 million by National Science Foundation

Ben Boulden

Aug. 3, 2015 | The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is part of a consortium of Arkansas institutions that has been awarded a five-year, $20 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support research and development of novel, functional surfaces produced using innovative materials and having nano-sized structures and features.


November 14, 2014

UAMS Researcher Receives Best NIH score for New Concept of Early Disease Diagnosis with Photoswitchable Nanoparticles

Ben Boulden

LITTLE ROCK – University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) researcher Vladimir Zharov, Ph.D., D.Sc., recently was awarded a $1.5 million R01 grant by the National Institutes of Health to investigate his diagnostic concept — “In vivo reading written in blood” — with new stimuli-responsive nanoparticles circulating in blood.


UAMS Researcher Receives Best NIH score for New Concept Early Disease Diagnosis with Photoswitchable Nanoparticles

Ben Boulden

Nov. 14, 2014 | University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) researcher Vladimir Zharov, Ph.D., D.Sc., recently was awarded a $1.5 million R01 grant by the National Institutes of Health to investigate his diagnostic concept — “In vivo reading written in blood” — with new stimuli-responsive nanoparticles circulating in blood.


November 13, 2014

UAMS Researcher Awarded $1.5 Million Grant to Study Early Disease Diagnosis with Nanoparticles

Ben Boulden

LITTLE ROCK – University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) researcher Vladimir Zharov, Ph.D., D.Sc., recently was awarded a $1.5 million grant by the National Institutes of Health to investigate the use of nanoparticles in cancer diagnosis and treatment.


June 23, 2014

Researcher Develops Way to Track Single Circulating Tumor Cells

Ben Boulden

June 23, 2014 | Researchers from University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have developed a new technological approach for tracking individual circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream, helping researchers identify the pathways of single cancer cells inside the body and possibly leading to the development of news ways to prevent the spread of cancer.


UAMS Researcher Develops Way to Track Single Circulating Tumor Cells

Ben Boulden

LITTLE ROCK – Researchers from University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have developed a new technological approach for tracking individual circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream, helping researchers identify the pathways of single cancer cells inside the body and that holds the promise to prevent cancer from spreading.